what’s florida’s state bird

Northern Mockingbirds live throughout the U.S. in both urban and rural environments. UF researchers recently discovered that these highly intelligent birds remember people who have threatened them in the past, and will attack if they see the same person again. Northern Mockingbird (Mimus polyglottos). Florida Museum photo by Kristen Grace Northern Mockingbird (Mimus polyglottos). Florida Museum photo by Kristen Grace Northern Mockingbird (Mimus polyglottos). Florida Museum photo by Kristen Grace Northern Mockingbird (Mimus polyglottos). Florida Museum photo by Kristen Grace Northern Mockingbird (Mimus polyglottos). Florida Museum photo by Kristen Grace

The Northern Mockingbird is one of the most iconic birds of the South. It is probably the bird that people see the most as they travel around in their everyday lives. It’s also the state bird of five states, one which is Florida.

It’s most famous of course because it’s a very vocal bird. They imitate the songs of at least 50 or 60 other species of Southern birds and they even mimic car horns and car alarms. But probably the reason why we see them most often is that they’re extremely aggressive. They attack almost anything they view as a threat including cats, including crows, hawks and even people. In fact, they really seem to take a particular dislike to some people; they attack them over and over again and seemingly ignore other people.

When we saw this we became curious about why it is they seem to really only dislike a certain number of us. So we decided to do an experiment when we were studying the Mockingbird nesting behavior. We divided up our students into two groups: one of whom would stand next to the nest and not touch it; and another group would stand next to the nest but actually touch the nest. We found that after a single trial the Mockingbird learned which humans were a threat and which ones weren’t, and they would start attacking the ones that touched the nest and they would ignore the ones that didn’t. They did this over and over again, and the more the students did this the stronger their reaction became, until eventually we found that they could even pick out the people who had touched the nest from a crowd of a hundred people. And they would ignore everyone else, go right for the person who had touched their nest, and it didn’t matter what clothes they were wearing, how they were wearing their hair, whether they were wearing a hat; they were obviously learning to recognize the face of these people.

We of course took this as one more line of evidence that birds are way, way more intelligent than we think. They have very small brains but those brains are really powerful, especially in things like this that really help them because these birds face a lot of predators. We think one of the reasons why they’re so common, they’re so successful, they do so well in urban environments, is they can learn very exactly who is a threat and who isn’t, even within predators. And in fact, this is one of the reasons why we think that being called a birdbrain is not an insult at all.

On display Sept. 23, 2017-Jan. 7, 2018, Rare, Beautiful & Fascinating: 100 Years @FloridaMuseum celebrated the Museum’s rich history. Each Museum collection was asked to contribute its most interesting items and share the stories that make them special. Though the physical exhibit is closed, this companion website remains online, providing an opportunity to experience the Florida Museum’s most treasured specimens.

Want to see more? Explore more than 300 breathtaking color photos of plants, animals, fossils and cultural heritage materials from the Florida Museum of Natural History’s collections in the award-winning book All Things Beautiful available from the University Press of Florida.

*This title was accurate at the time the exhibit was on display in 2017. Please visit the lab website to verify current staff and student information.

This was altered recently when researchers discovered that flamingos are native to the Sunshine State and were nearly exterminated during the early 20th century due to intense hunting. Since then, they have recovered, helped by captive flocks like the one at the Hialeah racetrack, but they are primarily found in Miami’s Biscayne Bay area, the Everglades, and the Florida Keys.

A move is underway to replace the migratory musical mockingbird with a bird that is more easily recognized as being from Florida.

The same cannot be said of the Florida scrub jay, described by the Cornell Lab of Ornithology as the sole bird species found only in Florida. Trouble is, there are only about 4,000 of them concentrated in central Florida and the federal government lists them as threatened.

Brandes did not suggest a mockingbird replacement in his legislation. However, separate bills introduced in the state Senate and House would make the blue-headed scrub jay an honorary member.

“Government protection or our tax dollars are not necessary for the mockingbird to survive; it is a well-established, independent, prolific bird,” Hammer wrote. “On any given day, it can be viewed, observed, studied, and enjoyed by kids and adults in every part of Florida.” “.

Want to see more? The University Press of Florida publishes the beloved book All Things Beautiful, which features over 300 stunning color photographs of plants, animals, fossils, and artifacts from the collections of the Florida Museum of Natural History.

Its most well-known feature is undoubtedly its loud voice. They mimic the sounds of car alarms and horns, as well as the songs of at least fifty or sixty different species of birds found in the South. But their extreme aggression is probably the main reason we see them most of the time. They attack nearly anything they perceive as a threat, which includes people, crows, hawks, and cats. In fact, they frequently attack certain people and appear to be oblivious to others, as if they have a special dislike for them.

Northern Mockingbirds live throughout the U. S. in both urban and rural environments. These extremely intelligent birds remember people who have threatened them in the past and will attack if they see them again, according to research from the University of Florida. Northern Mockingbird (Mimus polyglottos). Florida Museum photo by Kristen Grace Northern Mockingbird (Mimus polyglottos). Florida Museum photo by Kristen Grace Northern Mockingbird (Mimus polyglottos). Florida Museum photo by Kristen Grace Northern Mockingbird (Mimus polyglottos). Florida Museum photo by Kristen Grace Northern Mockingbird (Mimus polyglottos). Florida Museum photo by Kristen Grace.

Naturally, we interpreted this as additional proof that birds possess far greater intelligence than we previously believed. These birds face many predators, so even though their brains are small, they are incredibly powerful when it comes to things like this. We believe that one of the reasons they are so widespread, successful, and suited for urban environments is that they can accurately identify who poses a threat and who does not, even among predators. Indeed, this is among the reasons we believe that calling someone a birdbrain is not offensive at all.

On display Sept. 23, 2017-Jan. 7, 2018, Uncommon, Gorgeous Every museum collection was invited to submit its most intriguing objects and tell the tales that make them unique. The companion website is still accessible even though the physical exhibit has closed, giving visitors the chance to view some of the most valuable specimens held by the Florida Museum.

FAQ

What is Florida’s state bird and why?

This year-round Florida resident is known for its fierce defense of the family nest. Senate Concurrent Resolution No. 3 of the 1927 legislative session designated the mockingbird as the state bird. Not only a Florida favorite, it is also the state bird of Arkansas, Mississippi, Tennessee, and Texas.

Why is Florida changing the state bird?

The move comes after more than a decade of research concluded flamingos, which once inhabited the state by the thousands and likely nested in parts of the Everglades and Southwest Florida, are rebounding after being hunted to extinction in wetlands that were mostly reconfigured for flood control.

What is Florida’s state animal?

The most endangered of all Florida’s symbols is its state animal, the panther (Felis concolor coryi) which was chosen in 1982 by a vote of students throughout the state. The Florida Panther is a large, long-tailed, pale brown cat that grows to six feet or longer.

What is FL State fruit?

State
Food type
Food name
Florida
State fruit
Orange
State pie
Key lime pie
State honey
Tupelo honey
Georgia
State vegetable
Vidalia sweet onion