how to report a injured bird

If you find a wild animal in distress while youre out for a hike, traveling or even in your own backyard, get them the help they need. Find a wildlife rehabilitator in the alphabetical list below.

IMPORTANT! Before you “rescue” any wild animal, make sure the animal really needs your help. Determine if the animal is truly orphaned or injured. Learn How

For migratory birds: Arkansas Game and Fish Commission rehabilitators list. Animals other than birds: Arkansas Game and Fish Commission list of wildlife rehabilitators.

If you are in San Diego with native predatory wildlife in need of help, call The Fund for Animals Wildlife Center at 760-789-2324. Otherwise, use the California Department of Fish and Wildlife list of wildlife rehabilitators.

If you are in south Florida, call the South Florida Wildlife Center at 954-524-4302 or 866-SOS-WILD. Elsewhere, check the Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (PDF) list of wildlife rehabilitators.

No online listing of rehabilitators. Call your local Division of Forestry and Wildlife office for assistance.

No online listing of rehabilitators. Contact your Idaho Fish and Game Regional Office.

Maine Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife (PDF) list of wildlife rehabilitators by county.

No online listing of rehabilitators. Call your Missouri Department of Conservation Regional Office to locate a licensed rehabilitator.

No online listing of wildlife rehabilitators. Call your local Game and Parks Commission Conservation Officer to locate a licensed wildlife rehabilitator. You can also try contacting Nebraska Wildlife Rehab or Wildlife Rescue Team.

No online listing of wildlife rehabilitators. Call your local Game and Fish office to locate a licensed rehabilitator. You can also consult Animal Protection of New Mexico’s list of wildlife rehabilitators.

No online listing of wildlife rehabilitators. Call your local Game and Fish District Office or a veterinarian for assistance.

Pennsylvania Association of Wildlife Rehabilitators listing by county. If you are unable to find a wildlife rehabilitator, call your local Pennsylvania Game Commission Regional Office.

Rhode Island Department of Environmental Management If you are unable to find a wildlife rehabilitator, call the Rhode Island Department of Environmental Management at 401-789-3094 or 401-789-0281.

No online listing of wildlife rehabilitators. Call your Game, Fish & Parks Wildlife Division office to locate a licensed rehabilitator.

Does not permit rehabilitation of state wildlife. Call your local Department of Natural Resources District Office for assistance.

Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources list of wildlife rehabilitators. If you are unable to find a wildlife rehabilitator, call the DNRs Wildlife Rehabilitation Liaison at 715-359-5508.

Teton Raptor Center: Permitted facility caring for injured birds of prey. 5450 West Hwy. 22 Wilson, WY 83001 307-203-2551

Call your Game & Fish Department Regional Office to locate other licensed rehabilitators.

Rhode Island Department of Environmental Management If you are unable to find a wildlife rehabilitator, call the Rhode Island Department of Environmental Management at 401-789-3094 or 401-789-0281.

Maine Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife (PDF) list of wildlife rehabilitators by county.

No online listing of wildlife rehabilitators. Call your local Game and Fish District Office or a veterinarian for assistance.

No online listing of rehabilitators. Call your Missouri Department of Conservation Regional Office to locate a licensed rehabilitator.

No online listing of rehabilitators. Call your local Division of Forestry and Wildlife office for assistance.

Hundreds of young wild animals are needlessly picked up by members of the public every year, especially in the spring and summer, and sent to game wardens or wildlife rehabilitators for care and raising.

Lastly, take a look at the situation and if you find that the animal is injured or orphaned, take it to a licensed rehabilitator in your area. Do not attempt to treat or raise the animal yourself. Recall that possessing wildlife without the necessary state and federal permits is prohibited. It is recommended to place the animal in a sturdy cardboard box or a pet carrier covered with a towel until a transfer plan has been arranged. Air holes can be added to the box, but they should be tiny to allow the animal to spend as much time in the dark as possible. Never place wild birds in cages made of wire because they will hurt themselves trying to get out. Professionals with extensive training and experience, wildlife rehabilitators are knowledgeable about the unique dietary, behavioral, and environmental needs of various wildlife species. Only these extremely skilled individuals can offer an animal the best opportunity for a successful return to the wild if its parent is unable to be reunited with it.

Domestic pets should not be in close proximity to any suspected orphans due to the risk of disease transmission. Additionally, handling a wild animal carries a significant risk. Kindly visit the Texas Department of Health’s Zoonosis website for details on diseases that can be transmitted from animals to people, especially rabies. Visit the Texas Department of Health website to learn about the state’s rabies quarantine. Know the risks and the laws.

The following advice should assist you in minimizing stress or trauma to newborn animals, avoiding needless handling or picking them up, and increasing the likelihood that the animals will be successfully reintroduced into the wild. Please share this information with other people in your community. Recall that an animal’s best chance of surviving is with its natural parents because they are the ones who can guarantee that it keeps all of its instinctive abilities and behaviors necessary for survival in the wild.

According to a recent study by Texas rehabilitation specialist Ann Connell, in a few years, at least 20% of the deer fawns that were referred to her were not injured or orphans, but instead had been kidnapped 22% of their mothers. Usually, these were well-intentioned but misguided attempts to “rescue” fawns that appeared to have been abandoned. Anecdotal evidence indicates that the situation for young birds is either the same or worse. These data show that during the time of year when wildlife rehabilitators most need to focus their limited resources on truly orphaned or injured wildlife, these needless referrals to rehabilitators are not only costly and disruptive for wildlife rehabilitators but also harmful to the wildlife.

FAQ

What should I do with an injured bird?

If you find an injured bird, carefully put it in a cardboard box with a lid or a towel over the top, and place in a cool, safe place. Birds go into shock very easily when injured, and often die from the shock.

Can you call someone for an injured bird?

Call a licensed wildlife rehabilitator or animal control officer for help. Birds commonly collide with motor vehicles, tall buildings & windows. In some cases they may only be temporarily stunned or in shock and need some time to recover. Place them in a small box with air holes and place the box in a dark, warm place.

Who do I call for an injured wild bird near me?

For an injured, distressed or deceased wild animal or other wildlife concerns, contact LA Animal Services at 888-452-7381. You can also contact your local City shelter directly. Encounters with wildlife information curated with the same love and care we should all take with our somewhat wild neighbors.

What do you do with an injured bird in Houston?

How to Help Injured Wildlife. The Houston SPCA’s Wildlife Center of Texas (WCT) is Houston’s only trauma and wildlife rehabilitation center that treats all injured, sick or orphaned native Texas wildlife species, turning away no animal in need.