how to make a bird scarer

Step 3: Layout for Glueing

how to make a bird scarer

how to make a bird scarer

I covered the floor with an old plastic drop cloth because I didn’t have enough room on my work benches for a table, even though it might be easier on the back. Shiny side down, I arranged the six pieces for each line in a row. As you can see, I only had enough to place five pieces on one of them because some of the pieces were damaged during the fabrication process. – To have the six “second” pieces for each row handy for the glueing process, I stacked them on the end. Aligning the elongated twine proved to be the most challenging aspect of the task. This was due to the fact that I had to go through a few different iterations in order to hold the twine ends tightly. I settled on some old marble samples. They were small enough for me to work with just two lines at a time, and they were both heavy and flat on one side. Ultimately, it’s important to have the lines tight and stable across the center of the CD pieces, shiny side down, and to have the second pieces ready to be inserted once the epoxy has been applied.

Step 1: Materials Needed

how to make a bird scarer

how to make a bird scarer

how to make a bird scarer

how to make a bird scarer

Materials: – I’ve saved up a bunch of old work-related software install CDs; you can see that they are MS Enterprise products in other pictures. As stated in the introduction, I wanted two CD pieces for each reflector. Using six reflectors per line to create six lines, I was able to cut about 80 pieces out of 12 CDs. – I also had some leftover dollar store synthetic twine. You can see this cut and used in step 3. – Lastly, I like working with Loctite instant mix epoxy. They include two auto mix nozzles, which is useful because I usually don’t need the entire tube. I completed the first few sets using both of the leftover 1-minute packs, then I opened a new 5-minute pack to give me a little extra time to finish the remaining exercises and take some quality pictures. Tools: – To cut the CDs, use straight-cut tin snips or another tool. The CDs are very brittle, so scissors probably wont work. A bandsaw might. Experiment and see what works for you. To remove the sharp edges, use a power sander of some sort. A laser etcher/cutter would be ideal for this task. Alternatively, you could just cut them off, which would reduce the sharp points but not produce a result as smooth. – Scissors or something to cut the twine. – A device to secure the twine ends during the setup process before adhering I used old marble samples. Clamps and weights could also work. – Something to hold the pieces sandwiched with the line. I used the marble samples and some weights.

Introduction: Bird Scarer From Old CDs

how to make a bird scarer

It’s been an idea of mine for years, and I finally had the time to give it a try. I deliberately avoided searching the web for alternative solutions because I had given this a lot of thought and didn’t want my conclusions to be “tainted.” It was great to finally put it into practice, though I’m not sure how well these will work to scare the bird away from my freshly planted corm and pumpkin seeds, as well as the corn when it comes in. The plan was to cut the CD into pieces and use epoxy to sandwich twine (label inside, shiny side out) between two of the pieces. I planned to place roughly six reflectors on each line, with enough twine on one end to tie it onto wherever it would hang. I wanted two CD pieces for each reflector. After an hour of labor and $4 worth of epoxy (the rest being leftover materials), I believe they turned out rather well.

FAQ

What really scares birds away?

Generally speaking, birds hate strong smells, shiny objects, and predators, such as birds of prey and larger animals or humans.

What is an easy bird deterrent?

Birds don’t like the feel of the foil under their beaks and will stay away. You can also hang strips of aluminum foil (or shiny party streamers) from the trees or other high points around your home and garden. The sun reflects off the shiny surface and bothers their eyes, deterring them from coming near.

What do farmers use to scare birds away?

Propane scare cannons are one of the most common types of bird scarer available in Europe and America. It is a propane-powered gas gun which produces a periodic explosion. The audible bang can reach very loud volumes, in excess of 150 decibels, causing a flight reaction in birds.