how to keep birds off posts

Just repainted my mailbox and metal post black.required color. My neighborhood birds keep landing on my metal post and leaves me a white surprise every day.Anything I can put on my post to keep them off?other then a fake snake?dont think the mailman will like that choice!

Somehow my house and garden got tiny gnats that killed my fuchsia plant and fly everywhere. I have tried ALL the Web recommendations – soap and oil dishes, sand in th… See more

My marigold plants are growing. I heard that pinching the buds until Autumn will allow them to grow without killing the plant. Is this true?

I know that opinions vary, but whats your opinion?!I have great luck w Rosemary plants. Green all year long.

Suggestions on how to get rid of termites naturally are appreciated however if there is only a chemical solution for these pests please share as well. Thank you!

Remove The Soiled Mess

I’ll just say it because there isn’t really a nice way to put it. You’ll need the following materials to remove all of the “bird poop” that has dropped onto your mailbox:

  • My favorite (above) nylon scrub brush that I found at an estate sale was taken out of an old barn. I linked one similar).
  • Dish Soap
  • Bucket Of Water
  • Paper Towels
  • Simple Green or other cleaner

PLEASE NOTE: This is how I cleaned my Metal mailbox. There are various types of mailboxes available, including ones made of plastic and wood.

how to keep birds off posts

All you need to do is use the dry brush to remove some of the dirt, and then use soap and water to scrub it clean. If more cleaning is required, you may need to use “elbow grease.” I just used a few buckets of water to rinse off the soapy mailbox because I don’t have a hose long enough to reach it.

how to keep birds off posts

After that, I really scrubbed some of the tough areas in there using a toothbrush and some basic green. Additionally, this helped get into the nooks and crannies that scrubbing was unable to reach.

Upon clearing away all the debris, I discovered that some areas of the mailbox were lacking paint. There were literally a few silver spots showing through. This year, instead of painting our entire mailbox black like I used to, I just used a black sharpie to fill in the spots where the paint had chipped. It was as easy as that!.

Just repainted my mailbox and metal post black. required color. Every day, a flock of birds from my neighborhood land on my metal post and leave me a surprise of white. Other than a fake snake, is there anything I can put on my post to keep them away? I doubt the mailman will approve of that decision!

We welcome suggestions for natural termite removal, but if there is only a chemical solution, please let us know as well. Thank you!.

My marigold plants are growing. I’ve heard that you can allow the buds to grow without harming the plant by pinching them until autumn. Is this true?.

Somehow my house and garden got tiny gnats that killed my fuchsia plant and fly everywhere. I have tried ALL the Web recommendations – soap and oil dishes, sand in th… See more

I am aware that opinions differ, but what are yours? I have had amazing success with rosemary plants. Green all year long.

FAQ

How do I keep birds from pooping on my mailbox post?

Home stores and hardware websites offer a stunning array of fowl fouling solutions. They sell small spikes that you attach to surfaces to keep the birds from landing. There is reflective tape that purports to scare them off.

How do I keep birds off my pilings?

Use Bird Spikes: Attach bird spikes to the areas of your boat cover where birds tend to perch. These spikes make it uncomfortable for birds to land and discourage them from staying. Bird Netting For Boat Docks: Install bird netting above your boat cover.

How do you keep birds from nesting on columns?

Install bird spikes. Bird spikes are devices with small, needle-like rods that protrude from the base. These rods are dull and won’t harm birds, but will deter birds from perching and building a nest. You can place bird spikes on railings, ledges, under eaves, and anywhere that’s a likely nesting spot.