how to cover raspberries from birds

When I started working at Gardener’s Supply in the 1990s, my Vermont backyard was pretty green—with grass. Today, just a tiny bit of the original lawn remains. Most of the available space has given way to trees, shrubs, perennials, annuals and stonework.

While working at Gardener’s Supply, I also worked in the gardening division at Church Hill Landscapes. In that role, I maintained dozens of gardens and planted thousands of perennials, shrubs, and trees.

I left Gardener’s Supply in 2017 to get a master’s degree in ecological landscape design from the Conway School. Explore my portfolio from that training. You can reach me via LinkedIn.

If youre trying to keep birds from your crops, any scare device will work for a few days. But, birds are smart and will soon get used to it. Some effective visual scare methods include hanging pie tins, replicas of predators, reflective tape, or large, scare-eye balloons (that mimic the scary eyes of predator birds). Noisemakers, such as radios, are also useful.

But the most effective technique is exclusion. Bird netting protects tree fruit and berries if installed two to three weeks before fruit matures. You can also cover maturing corn ears with paper bags, and lay garden fabric over germinating seedlings to foil the birds.

Several years ago, we planted a long row of blueberries to mark the edge of our display garden. The area had always been planted with daffodils, so it was glorious in springtime, but sort of dull after that. To add some multi-season interest, we planted blueberries: creamy white springtime flowers, beautiful foliage in the fall, interesting branches in the winter and, of course, delicious fruit.

The Adjustable Super Hoops can be used to create a tunnel up to 62 inches high.

The birds were quick to discover this new planting, so we rarely enjoyed the summer bounty. For a few years we thought, well, the hedge is a good example of creating backyard habitat for wildlife.

One year, we tried something different. Call us selfish, but a few weeks before the fruit got ripe, we set up a quick-and-easy bird barrier, made with 7-foot bamboo poles and bird netting. We lashed the poles together to create teepees for the row-ends and V-shapes for the center. Then, we draped the structure with netting. Earth Staples held the net in place.

“This is the first year we havent lost the entire crop to the birds,” said Sarah, who managed the display gardens. “Two big bags of berries are already in the freezer.”

Have a Birdbath to Quench Their Thirst

Most birds are thought to be thirsty, which is why they pluck your raspberries in order to get at the juice. If you give birds access to water, they might not care about your raspberries. It would be even better if you could incorporate the sound of water cascading through a fountain.

All the birds will come for this, and some of them will eat the insects.

The birds will still consume your raspberries if they are hungry.

If you feed the birds, they might be persuaded to ignore your raspberries. If you put bird feeders close to your raspberries, the birds will come there instead of your crops.

Can aid in the control of insect infestations.

  • If you don’t keep your bird feeders filled, birds will visit your raspberries.
  • The bird feeders will attract more birds to your compound.
  • Outside berries can be consumed by birds

Protecting Your Raspberries from Birds

There are many ways to protect your raspberries from birds. Here are the main ways:

But the most effective technique is exclusion. Installing bird netting two to three weeks prior to fruit maturity protects berries and tree fruit. Additionally, you can cover maturing corn ears with paper bags and cover germination seedlings with garden fabric to keep birds away.

We delineated the perimeter of our showcase garden with an elongated row of blueberries several years back. The area was gorgeous in the spring but kind of boring after that because daffodils had always been planted there. We planted blueberries to provide some multi-season interest: delicious fruit in the summer, gorgeous foliage in the fall, intriguing branches in the winter, and creamy white springtime flowers.

While working at Gardener’s Supply, I also worked in the gardening division at Church Hill Landscapes. In that role, I maintained dozens of gardens and planted thousands of perennials, shrubs, and trees.

One year, we tried something different. Call us self-centered, but we quickly and easily constructed a bird barrier using bird netting and seven-foot bamboo poles a few weeks before the fruit ripened. Teepees for the row ends and V-shapes for the center were made by lashing the poles together. Then, we draped the structure with netting. Earth Staples held the net in place.

We hardly ever got to enjoy the summer bounty because the birds quickly found this new planting. For a few years, we believed that the hedge was an excellent example of providing wildlife habitat in a backyard.

FAQ

How do I protect my raspberry plants from birds?

Some effective visual scare methods include hanging pie tins, replicas of predators, reflective tape, or large, scare-eye balloons (that mimic the scary eyes of predator birds). Noisemakers, such as radios, are also useful. But the most effective technique is exclusion.

How do I keep birds away from my berries?

To repel birds in blueberries, cherries and grapes, mix 4 packets of grape Kool-Aid in one gallon of water and spray the plant and the fruit when the fruit begin to color and attract birds. Several applications during the season may be necessary. This product is also sold a ARe-Jex-It@ as a bird repellant.

How do you keep animals from eating raspberries?

Bird netting is a foolproof way to keep your raspberries safe from birds. Scaring birds’ techniques will work for a few days to keep birds away from your crops. Exclusion, on the other hand, is the most effective approach. If birds are stealing the berries from your raspberry bush, use netting to keep them safe.

Do raspberries need to be netted?

Raspberries are hardy, vigorous plants that grow well in most locations, especially in cooler regions. They do need annual pruning and support for their tall stems. It’s also best to protect the crop from birds, by either growing in a fruit cage or covering plants with netting while the berries are ripening.