how to clean vision bird cage

Cleaning your birds cage can at first seem like a tedious chore. With so many bars, cracks, and crevices to scrub, it can be hard for new bird owners to figure out where to start.

Setting and adhering to a cleaning schedule for your birds cage is essential to keeping this job as easy to handle as possible. Breaking the process down into simple tasks to be completed daily, weekly, and monthly not only saves you time and energy but ensures that your bird always has a clean and comfortable cage to live in.

Daily Cleaning

Birds kept in unclean cages are susceptible to a number of serious health issues. Daily cleaning is necessary to reduce your pet’s risk of infection. To maintain the best possible condition for your bird cage, simply follow these instructions every day:

  • Change the cage liner. Not only is it uncomfortable, but walking around in dropped food and droppings is unhealthy for birds. Unchanged cage papers can also emit a very unpleasant stench. Make sure to replace the liner in your bird’s cage on a daily basis to prevent these issues.
  • Clean Food and Water Dishes. Every day, take out your birds’ food and water bowls and give them a quick wash with a mild dish soap. This will stop any bacteria from growing that might endanger your pet. Before reintroducing them to their cage, make sure you give them a thorough wash and drying.
  • Wipe Down Surfaces. Spot clean the cage’s surfaces, such as the bars, perches, and any toys, with a moist cloth or paper towel. To clean stubborn, stuck-on messes, use a bird-safe cage cleaner.

how to clean vision bird cage

The Spruce / Ulyana Verbytska

how to clean vision bird cage

The Spruce / Ulyana Verbytska

how to clean vision bird cage

The Spruce / Ulyana Verbytska

While I clean the vision cage, I suppose I could add them to the cockatiel cage for the time being, but I’m scared of World War II!

The older red-lored amazon is grumpy and doesn’t like the mealy, so my parents usually put the birds in their spare/travel cages (they have one for each bird). After that, they take the large cages outside and literally hose them down and clean them up. It may not be a viable option, but that’s what they’ve discovered is most effective for them .

@nikkialys: Nope, we don’t use carriers. I’ll come up with something, though, because I prefer steam cleaning to “washing” it!

My mother and I, back when I was living at home, would clean the bird cages (which housed cockatiels, lovebirds, and budgies) with diluted dish soap. But placing the birds somewhere to be cleaned up wasn’t really a problem because they were fairly tame and enjoyed hanging out outside the cage every day. Small travel cages are available for around $20, which is fairly inexpensive (pun intended!). You can use them in the event that you need to visit the vet or for other purposes.

@pfinarffle: I have three pets: a lovebird, a budgie, and a conure. They get along just fine. However, we do have two other cages: one, which is too crowded and contains diamond doves and a finch, and another, which is larger and contains only a cockatiel. The cockatiel is kept alone in the cage because he used to be with the conure group and would attack other birds. He is not friendly but gets along just fine on his own.

Weekly Cleaning

Select a day of the week to finish your weekly cage cleaning tasks. Complying with these duties lessens the possibility that bacteria and other pathogens will settle down with your bird.

  • Wash the Cages Tray. The bottom of bird cages has a tray where the cage liners are placed. At minimum once a week, this tray needs to be taken out and cleaned with a moist cloth and cage cleaner. Always make sure the tray is dry before replacing the liners and putting them back in. ​​.
  • Remove and Scrub the Grate. A grate at the bottom of some bird cages is suspended over the tray, allowing droppings to fall through to the bottom of the cage. Every week, this grate needs to be scrubbed to get rid of any dried droppings that might have accumulated on it. Placing a grate in a bathtub and using a scrub brush to remove waste is the simplest way to clean it. Make sure it is completely dry before putting it back in the cage, just like you should with other cage parts.
  • Clean and Change the Perches. Additionally, perches can gather debris and waste, which could serve as a haven for bacteria. Once a week, they should be washed and soaked to get rid of any bacteria that might be hiding from them. It’s a good idea to have a few “back-up” perches on hand because some perches, particularly the wooden ones, take a while to dry after cleaning. Place these in the cage with your birds while the cleaned ones are drying.
  • Clean and Rotate Toys. Birds use their mouths to investigate and play with their toys, just like newborn humans do. Any toys in your pet’s cage should be taken out, soaked, and cleaned once a week. Similar to the perches, it could be beneficial to provide your bird with an assortment of toys. In this manner, you can make sure that your bird doesn’t grow bored with his toys by switching them around once a week when you clean.

how to clean vision bird cage

The Spruce / Ulyana Verbytska

how to clean vision bird cage

The Spruce / Ulyana Verbytska

how to clean vision bird cage

The Spruce / Ulyana Verbytska

how to clean vision bird cage

The Spruce / Ulyana Verbytska

FAQ

What is the best solution to clean a bird cage?

To be most effective, disinfectants should be applied to a wet surface. A high-quality liquid dish soap is also useful for cleaning cages, bowls, and perches. For aviary or flock situations, a disinfectant with broader antimicrobial properties may be more beneficial.

Can I use Dawn to clean bird cage?

Original Dawn dish soap, the Pet Crate and Cage Cleaner from Oxyfresh, hot water, and some good brushes and sponges will help you tackle nearly all household messes. Dawn dish soap is a great cleaner.

Is white vinegar safe to clean bird cage?

Just be sure to dilute the soap in warm water and rinse thoroughly after washing so that there are no soapy residue left behind. You can also use vinegar and baking soda to clean bird cages, as both are safe for birds and their environment.

How do you get dried bird poop off a cage?

Use Poop Off to saturate the drippings, cage, and/or toys. Rinse the cage well with plain water and then let dry completely before replacing toys. Clean toys and perches. Remove droppings from all toys and accessories with a bird-friendly cleaner like Poop Off.