how to bury a pet bird

The death of a pet is a painful experience for any owner, and particularly in the case of birds whose lifespans often number in the decades, this sense of loss can be overwhelming. Birds often become more than just pets—they are loved and treasured members of your family, and just like any other family member, their absence is keenly felt. While death is an inevitable part of pet ownership, the grief and sadness that comes with losing a long-time companion can be difficult to bear. Read on for some things to keep in mind when dealing with the pain of a bird’s death.

The death of a beloved pet can elicit many difficult emotions, from sadness to anger to guilt, and it is important to keep in mind that these feelings are a natural part of grieving. Grief is a long and complex process that everyone deals with differently, and while some members of your family might appear to work through their grief sooner, others might need more time. The other birds or pets in your home might also deal with loss in their own ways, and may call or search for their missing friend. Grief is a normal reaction to the death of a cherished part of the family, and as such it is vital to give loved ones the space and support to process the emotions they experience after this loss.

Choosing where you want your bird’s body to go after their death can be a very personal decision for owners, and there a few options you can elect to pursue. While burying your bird on your property is a popular option and gives you the ability to visit your bird’s grave whenever you like, local laws might prohibit it, and it is not a good option in homes with other pets. Consulting with a veterinarian after your bird’s death is often the best recourse, allowing owners the ability to explore which burial options will work for their situation. Whether you want to explore cremation or lay your bird to rest in a designated cemetery, a trained professional can help guide your decision and help you give your pet the best possible send-off.

If the death of your bird was more sudden than expected, a necropsy can be an option to help provide closure and ascertain the exact cause of death. A veterinarian can inspect the body for signs of trauma, examine organs for disease or damage and run tests to evaluate if bacteria or a virus played a role in your bird’s untimely death. For households that include other birds, a necropsy can help ensure your bird did not pass a disease on to the others. While it can be difficult in the aftermath of a death to worry about sending your bird’s body to be evaluated, a necropsy can give owners the peace of mind that they are not to blame for their bird’s death, and help them find healing moving forward.

At myBird, we know how much joy birds can bring, and seek to give bird lovers the knowledge they need to best care for their pets. Follow us on Facebook and Instagram, and be sure to check out our other posts about birds or take our quiz to see which types of birds may be right for you!

It’s crucial to remember that the loss of a cherished pet can cause a range of challenging emotions, including sadness, anger, and guilt. These emotions are a normal aspect of grieving. Everyone experiences grief differently, and although some members of your family may seem to get over their loss more quickly than others, others may require more time. Grief is a long and complicated process. The other birds or animals in your house may also call or look for their missing friend as a way to cope with loss. Giving loved ones the time and space to process their feelings following a loss is crucial because grief is a natural response to the death of a cherished family member.

Knowing the joy that birds can bring, we at myBird aim to arm avian enthusiasts with the knowledge they need to provide the best care for their pets. Take our quiz to find out which kinds of birds might be best for you, and don’t forget to follow us on Facebook and Instagram! You can also read through our other posts about birds.

Every pet owner experiences pain when their pet passes away, but for bird owners—whose lifespans frequently span decades—the sense of loss can be unbearable. Birds frequently grow to be more than just house pets; they become cherished and adored members of your family, and you feel their absence deeply. Even though owning a pet entails the inevitable loss of a companion, the grief and sadness that accompany this loss can be extremely difficult to handle. Continue reading for some tips on how to handle the grief of a bird’s passing.

A necropsy may be an option if your bird’s death was unexpectedly abrupt in order to help bring closure and determine the precise cause of death. A veterinarian can perform tests to determine whether bacteria or a virus contributed to your bird’s premature death, check the body for signs of trauma, and look for illness or damage in the organs. A necropsy can ensure that your bird did not infect the other birds in the household if there are any other birds living there. While worrying about having your bird’s body examined after a death can be difficult, a necropsy can provide owners with the reassurance that their bird did not die at their hands and aid in their recovery.

Owners have a lot of personal freedom in deciding where they want their bird’s body to go after they pass away, and you have a few options. Although burying your bird on your property is a common choice that allows you to visit your bird’s grave whenever you want, it is not a good idea in homes where there are other pets and may even be prohibited by local laws. The best course of action after your bird dies is usually to consult a veterinarian. This will enable the owner to determine which burial options are appropriate for their particular circumstances. A qualified expert can assist in guiding your decision and assisting you in providing the best possible send-off for your pet, regardless of whether you wish to investigate cremation or bury your bird in a designated cemetery.

Is it a good idea to bury him in a pot on our balcony, as I was thinking?

My bird passed away a few days ago, and I’m not sure where to bury him. It is illegal for me to bury him in a garden, the woods, or somewhere similar.

FAQ

What to do if your pet bird dies?

Consulting with a veterinarian after your bird’s death is often the best recourse, allowing owners the ability to explore which burial options will work for their situation.

Should I bury a dead bird?

After you pick up the dead bird, turn the bag back on itself and tie it. Then place it in a second bag, tie the bag, and throw it away in a garbage can. If you can’t place the dead bird in plastic bags and throw it away, you can bury it. Do not bury it in a plastic bag.

What do you do with a dead bird outside?

Place the bagged bird inside another plastic bag and discard in garbage receptacle. Alternatively, you may choose to pick up the bird with a shovel and bury in the ground: Dig a hole about two feet deep, place bird carcass in the hole using the shovel to scoop it in, and cover with soil.

Can I bury my bird in a park?

Is it okay to bury a dead bird at the park? Bury animals is frowned upon and in many cases illegal in public areas such as parks. It’s mostly for health reasons as who knows if what the animal died from might not affect people or other animals in some way.