do red winged black birds migrate

Years ago, when I had a lawn with a sad, lonely bird feeder in the middle of it, I would senselessly chase away flocks of Red-winged Blackbirds because I didn’t want them eating the birdseed I put out for the “special” birds I thought deserved to be there. I considered Red-winged Blackbirds common “trash birds” and not worthy of even being in my yard. I didn’t know the most common bird throughout the year in Georgia is the Northern Cardinal, followed by the Carolina Wren, Carolina Chickadee, Tufted Titmouse, Mourning Dove , Red-Bellied Woodpecker and many of the other birds I was incomprehensibly trying to “curate” at my feeder for a personalized backyard nature show.

Red-winged Blackbirds are not really that common and do not even make the top 20 list in Georgia because despite their large numbers nationally and when they flock, they only appear for a couple months at most in select areas of the South. Their summer habitats are marshes or wet meadows and they prefer foraging at ground level. When they migrate South in winter they may roost in marshes but show up anywhere they can find food including backyard bird feeders.

My husband thought the Red-winged Blackbirds were fascinating and loved watching their antics. He asked me why I was so harsh towards them. I told him they were greedy and ate all the birdseed. He pointed out that I put out a birdfeeder for birds, they were birds, they need to eat, and we could afford to buy all the birdseed we wanted to keep the feeder full. His kindness and logic helped me soften a bit towards them, but it wasn’t until I transitioned my yard to a wildlife sanctuary that I embraced all wildlife as part of a healthy ecosystem and I realized the Red-winged Blackbirds belong there just as much as the Eastern Bluebirds (#12 on the most common birds in Georgia list!).

My changing view on Red-winged Blackbirds is another example of how Im unlearning the idea that I’m in charge of deconstructing nature into what is desirable to me and banishing or destroying anything I don’t like for any reason. Multiply this thinking by every person on a street, in a city or country and the negative externality to the environment is exponentially destructive. It makes it easier to understand why insects, birds, and native plants are disappearing at an alarming rate.

When a devastating study came out in 2019 showing there are 25% fewer birds in North America than there were 50 years ago, I realized every single bird needs our help. Even though Red-winged Blackbirds are still one of the most abundant birds in North America, like all birds, they have also decreased in number. Red-winged Blackbirds hold the world record for the highest count of a single species, with an estimate of 40 million individuals during an Audubon Christmas Bird Count in Arkansas in December 1964. A winter flocks of mixed birds can still have more than a few million birds in them and smaller groups of birds can spread out over 50 miles each day to forage and re-form at night to roost…but this number is nowhere near the 40 million Red-winged Blackbirds witnessed one day almost 60 years ago. We need to do everything we can to make sure seeing flocks of birds doesn’t become like the windshield phenomenon.

I look forward to the sight of the first flock of Red-winged Blackbirds in late December and help sustain them until they leave to migrate back North in early March. They prefer to eat grains and seeds on the ground, so I put out cracked corn and sunflower seeds on platform feeders. When the visiting flocks seem to be at their peak, I’ll throw a few handfuls around the backyard because I know the Red-winged Blackbirds will work with other ground feeding birds, squirrels and chipmunks to make sure nothing will be left to attract rats.

People love to complain about Red-winged Blackbirds overwhelming their bird feeders and claim they keep away all the other birds, but I’m not so sure this is the case. When they swarm, they take over, but I see plenty of other birds at the feeders and in my yard before and after they descend. I just need to refill the feeders more often.

I also have both tube style and platform feeders. Larger birds like Red-winged Blackbirds have a harder time getting the seed out of the tube feeder so there’s always food for the small birds. My small semi-urban yard is rewilded and my year-round birds are also not as dependent on my feeders in winter because there are plenty of leaves to poke through for insects on a nice day and seeds in my winter seedhead garden.

I’ve noticed my yard gets quiet at some point in November and part of December during the migration transition when even the year-round birds become scarce. The return of the Red-winged Blackbirds seems to be related in timing to other birds also reappearing soon after, including flocks of American Robins and Cedar Waxwings. There’s protective strength in numbers and maybe the Red-winged Blackbirds being in the area gives all the other birds a bit of cover from predators like neighborhood hawks. I don’t think we can fully understand how complicated the interdependence between the cycles of nature and wildlife are.

The following are just a few additional tidbits I learned about Red-winged blackbirds to drive home how special they are in many ways:

I have no reservations welcoming all the Red-winged Blackbirds who want to visit my yard. They’re special enough to restock the birdfeeders for.

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I will gladly welcome any Red-winged Blackbird that wishes to come to my yard. They’re special enough to restock the birdfeeders for.

My husband thought the Red-winged Blackbirds were fascinating and loved watching their antics. He asked me why I was so harsh towards them. I told him they were greedy and ate all the birdseed. He pointed out that I put out a birdfeeder for birds, they were birds, they need to eat, and we could afford to buy all the birdseed we wanted to keep the feeder full. His kindness and logic helped me soften a bit towards them, but it wasn’t until I transitioned my yard to a wildlife sanctuary that I embraced all wildlife as part of a healthy ecosystem and I realized the Red-winged Blackbirds belong there just as much as the Eastern Bluebirds (#12 on the most common birds in Georgia list!).

I also have both tube style and platform feeders. There is always food for the smaller birds because larger birds, like Red-winged Blackbirds, have a harder time getting the seed out of the tube feeder. There are plenty of leaves to poke through for insects on a nice day and seeds in my winter seedhead garden, so my small semi-urban yard is rewilded and my year-round birds are less reliant on my feeders in the winter.

My changing view on Red-winged Blackbirds is another example of how Im unlearning the idea that I’m in charge of deconstructing nature into what is desirable to me and banishing or destroying anything I don’t like for any reason. Multiply this thinking by every person on a street, in a city or country and the negative externality to the environment is exponentially destructive. It makes it easier to understand why insects, birds, and native plants are disappearing at an alarming rate.

I look forward to the sight of the first flock of Red-winged Blackbirds in late December and help sustain them until they leave to migrate back North in early March. They prefer to eat grains and seeds on the ground, so I put out cracked corn and sunflower seeds on platform feeders. When the visiting flocks seem to be at their peak, I’ll throw a few handfuls around the backyard because I know the Red-winged Blackbirds will work with other ground feeding birds, squirrels and chipmunks to make sure nothing will be left to attract rats.

Godfrey, W. Earl. 1986. National Museums of Canada, Ottawa, revised edition of “The Birds of Canada” Peterson, Roger Tory 1961. Houghton Mifflin Company, Boston; National Audubon Society; National Wildlife Federation; Peterson Field Guides – Western Birds Robbins, Chandler S. , Bertel Bruun, Herbert S. Zim, Arthur Singer. 1983. Birds of North America: A Guide to Field Identification, Golden Press, New York

In Canada, these well-known birds are among the first indications of spring. Their spring migration takes place from mid-February through mid-May. Their fall southern migration begins as early as August. In the spring, the male red-winged blackbird returns before the female, and in the fall, it departs afterwards. They migrate in large flocks and travel during the day.