did you find the birds suspenseful explain

Perhaps in Daphne du Mauriers story, “The Birds,” what she describes is more important than what her characters say, by way of adding to the storys overall suspense.

Dialogue is general a source of enormous amounts of information in a story, but Nat, our protagonist, is not very outgoing, so much of what we learn that occurs in the story comes from his simply observations, which may partly be due to his stint in the army—he is observant, seeing things that others dont notice, or that they discount, and he is more of a thinker than a talker.

Some of the specific details that stand out for me include the massing of the birds on the water. Their sheer number makes the detail take on a deeper significance, and even Nat cannot ignore the potential significance of the seriousness of such an event.

The ferocious attacks visited upon Nats family and their home is all the more suspenseful in the innocuous way in which the threat begins. As his family sleeps, Nat hears a tapping at the window. Opening to investigate, he is attacked by a bird. Soon, the tapping begins again, and increases: thus introducing a heightened sense of suspense and fear.

After the first night, when Nat looks outside and sees not one chimney fire burning, the reader is struck first with the question as to why no one has gotten up to light their home fires. This introduces a sense of suspense.

With further consideration, there is the suggestion of the isolation Nat and his family are now experiencing, and the extent of the danger in which they find themselves; when Nat visits the Trigg farm and finds everyone dead, the unlit fires take on new meaning.

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Are you referring to the Hitchcock film? If so, I would agree that it is tense; after all, Hitchcock was dubbed “the master of suspense.” In this little town, there’s a lot of suspense about what these birds could do. Hitchcock provides us with hints, but these birds are feral yet motivated by a darker force.

The reader is initially confronted with the question of why nobody has gotten up to light their home fires after the first night when Nat looks outside and notices that not a single chimney fire is burning. This introduces a sense of suspense.

In general, dialogue is a story’s most abundant source of information. However, Nat, the protagonist, is not particularly gregarious, so much of what we learn about him comes from his simple observations. This may be partially explained by the fact that he served in the army; he is perceptive, seeing things that others miss or ignore, and he is more of a thinker than a talker.

Because of how innocently the threat starts, the vicious attacks on Nat’s family and their home are all the more suspenseful. Nat hears a tap at the window while his family is sleeping. Opening to investigate, he is attacked by a bird. Before long, the tapping starts up again and gets louder, which heightens the tension and anxiety.

Upon closer examination, it becomes apparent how isolated Nat and his family are now and how dangerous their situation is; the unlit fires take on new significance when Nat visits the Trigg farm and discovers everyone is dead.

The gathering of the birds on the water is one of the particular details that really jumps out to me. Because of their sheer quantity, the detail assumes a deeper significance, and even Nat is unable to downplay the possibility that this is a serious incident.

FAQ

How is The Birds suspenseful?

One way Hitchcock uses suspense in his film “The Birds” is by making the characters partake in very slow movements. For instance, in the scene where Melanie Daniels is slowly walking up the stairs because she hears strange noises, she moves very slowly up the stairs, and takes a very long time opening the door.

How does the author build suspense in The Birds?

“The Birds” Essay Daphne Du Maurier maintains suspense throughout her short story “The birds” by using different examples of literary devices such as foreshadowing, mood, and cliffhangers. She builds up suspense by using each device a different way.

What does Nat ask his wife to do before he leaves the house?

What does Nat ask his wife to do before he leaves the house? Nat asks his wife to keep all the doors and windows closed. He asked her to do this to be on the safe side.