can quails get bird flu

WASHINGTON, March 2, 2022 – The United States Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) has confirmed the presence of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) in two non-commercial backyard flocks (non-poultry) in Connecticut and Iowa.

Samples from the Connecticut flock were tested at the University of Connecticut Veterinary Medical Diagnostic Laboratory and samples from the Iowa flock were tested at the Iowa State University Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory, both part of the National Animal Health Laboratory Network. The cases were confirmed at the APHIS National Veterinary Services Laboratories (NVSL) in Ames, Iowa. APHIS is working closely with state animal health officials in Connecticut and Iowa on joint incident responses. State officials quarantined the affected premises, and birds on the properties will be depopulated to prevent the spread of the disease. Birds from the flocks will not enter the food system.

According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the recent HPAI detections in birds do not present an immediate public health concern. No human cases of these avian influenza viruses have been detected in the United States. As a reminder, the proper handling and cooking of poultry and eggs to an internal temperature of 165 ˚F kills bacteria and viruses.

As part of existing avian influenza response plans, Federal and State partners are working jointly on additional surveillance and testing in areas around the affected flocks. The United States has the strongest AI surveillance program in the world, and USDA is working with its partners to actively look for the disease in commercial poultry operations, live bird markets and in migratory wild bird populations.

Anyone involved with poultry production from the small backyard to the large commercial producer should review their biosecurity activities to assure the health of their birds. APHIS has materials about biosecurity, including videos, checklists, and a toolkit available at https://www.aphis.usda.gov/aphis/ourfocus/animalhealth/animal-disease-information/avian/defend-the-flock-program/dtf-resources/dtf-resources

USDA will report these findings to the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) as well as international trading partners. USDA also continues to communicate with trading partners to encourage adherence to OIE standards and minimize trade impacts. OIE trade guidelines call on member countries to not impose bans on the international trade of poultry commodities in response to such notifications in non-poultry.

APHIS will continue to announce the first case of HPAI in commercial and non-commercial backyard flocks detected in a State but will not announce subsequent detections in the State. All cases in commercial and non-commercial backyard flocks will be listed on the APHIS website at https://www.aphis.usda.gov/aphis/ourfocus/animalhealth/animal-disease-information/avian/avian-influenza/2022-hpai

In addition to practicing good biosecurity, all bird owners should prevent contact between their birds and wild birds and report sick birds or unusual bird deaths to State/Federal officials, either through their state veterinarian or through APHIS’ toll-free number at 1-866-536-7593. APHIS urges producers to consider bringing birds indoors when possible to further prevent exposures. The Animal Health Protection Act authorizes APHIS to provide indemnity payments to producers for birds and eggs that must be depopulated during a disease response. APHIS also provides compensation for disposal activities and virus elimination activities. Additional information on biosecurity for non-commercial backyard flocks can be found at http://healthybirds.aphis.usda.gov.

Additional background Avian influenza (AI) is caused by an influenza type A virus which can infect poultry (such as chickens, turkeys, pheasants, quail, domestic ducks, geese, and guinea fowl) and is carried by free flying waterfowl such as ducks, geese and shorebirds. AI viruses are classified by a combination of two groups of proteins: hemagglutinin or “H” proteins, of which there are 16 (H1–H16), and neuraminidase or “N” proteins, of which there are 9 (N1–N9). Many different combinations of “H” and “N” proteins are possible. Each combination is considered a different subtype and can be further broken down into different strains which circulate within flyways/geographic regions. AI viruses are further classified by their pathogenicity (low or high)—the ability of a particular virus strain to produce disease in domestic poultry. #

USDA touches the lives of all Americans each day in so many positive ways. In the Biden-Harris Administration, USDA is transforming America’s food system with a greater focus on more resilient local and regional food production, fairer markets for all producers, ensuring access to safe, healthy and nutritious food in all communities, building new markets and streams of income for farmers and producers using climate smart food and forestry practices, making historic investments in infrastructure and clean energy capabilities in rural America, and committing to equity across the Department by removing systemic barriers and building a workforce more representative of America. To learn more, visit www.usda.gov.

HPAI in your flock

The Minnesota Board of Animal Health responds to avian influenza cases.

If there are sudden spikes in the number of birds dying in your flock or if many of the birds show symptoms of HPAI, get in touch with your veterinarian or the Minnesota Board of Animal Health at 651-296-2942.

You can contact the laboratories at:

  • Minnesota Poultry Testing Laboratory: 320-231-5170
  • University of Minnesota Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory: 612-625-8787

Stopping the spread of HPAI

Birds are euthanized on farms confirmed with HPAI. A 6-mile radius around a confirmed case will see flocks tested for HPAI. These flocks will also be checked throughout the outbreak. Euthanasia will only occur on-premises with infected birds. If your flock is put to sleep under the care of the USDA or the Minnesota Board of Animal Health, you will receive financial compensation.

Detecting HPAI early is key to limiting the spread. Sadly, unexpected, unexplained death is one of the early indicators of HPAI. In the majority of HPAI cases, the poultry died for unknown reasons after consuming less water.

  • Egg layers may be quieter than usual, have ruffled feathers, and exhibit depressive symptoms. Other signs may include purple or dry combs.
  • Turkeys may exhibit quiet, melancholy behavior, lay down more frequently than usual, and swell around their eyes.
  • Although they don’t always die from HPAI or exhibit symptoms, waterfowl can harbor the virus and infect other birds.

To ensure the health of their birds, anyone engaged in the production of poultry, regardless of size—from small backyard farmers to large commercial producers—should assess their biosecurity measures. Videos, checklists, and a toolkit regarding biosecurity are available from APHIS at https://www aphis. usda. gov/aphis/ourfocus/animalhealth/animal-disease-information/avian/defend-the-flock-program/dtf-resources/dtf-resources.

Federal and State partners are collaborating to conduct additional surveillance and testing in the vicinity of the affected flocks as part of the current avian influenza response plans. With the world’s most robust AI surveillance program, the US Department of Agriculture is actively searching for the disease in commercial poultry operations, live bird markets, and migratory wild bird populations in collaboration with its partners.

According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the recent HPAI detections in birds do not present an immediate public health concern. No human cases of these avian influenza viruses have been detected in the United States. As a reminder, the proper handling and cooking of poultry and eggs to an internal temperature of 165 ˚F kills bacteria and viruses.

USDA touches the lives of all Americans each day in so many positive ways. In the Biden-Harris Administration, USDA is transforming America’s food system with a greater focus on more resilient local and regional food production, fairer markets for all producers, ensuring access to safe, healthy and nutritious food in all communities, building new markets and streams of income for farmers and producers using climate smart food and forestry practices, making historic investments in infrastructure and clean energy capabilities in rural America, and committing to equity across the Department by removing systemic barriers and building a workforce more representative of America. To learn more, visit www.usda.gov.

WASHINGTON, March 2, 2022 – Two non-commercial backyard flocks (non-poultry) in Connecticut and Iowa have been found to have highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI), according to the USDA’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS).

FAQ

What birds can get avian flu?

Which birds are most likely to be infected with avian (bird) influenza (flu) A viruses? Wild birds that carry bird flu viruses include waterbirds, like ducks, geese and swans, and shorebirds, like storks. Bird flu viruses can easily spread from wild birds to poultry, like chickens and turkeys.

Do quails carry diseases?

Quail are susceptible to a variety of noninfectious, infectious, and parasitic diseases. Because they are related to chickens and turkeys, many of the diseases in quail are similar to those in poultry.

Is bird flu fatal to all birds?

Avian influenza, or “bird flu,” is a respiratory disease of birds caused by influenza A viruses. Wild birds, such as ducks, gulls, and shorebirds, can carry and spread these viruses but may show no signs of illness. However, avian influenza can kill domestic poultry (such as chickens, turkeys, ducks, and geese).

Can backyard chickens get bird flu?

Although it is possible for domestic poultry to become infected with avian influenza from direct contact with wild birds, it is more likely that avian influenza viruses are spread indirectly to poultry on contaminated feed, clothing, and equipment.