can cockatiels breed with other birds

Male cockatiel trying to mate w another male cockatiel

For a while, my two male cockatiels were housed in the same cage, and one of them was humping the other when it came time to feed them. I’m not sure if that’s typical or what I should do. I will get them in two different cages. Do u think this will help? Thanks for your response.

Same-sex cockatiels in captivity frequently bond like males and females, and mating is frequent. It’s harmless unless one bird is being aggressive or obsessive. You can separate them if they are continuously mating and chasing each other. It’s also possible that one of the birds you have mislabeled as a female instead of a male. Not all cockatiels can be sexed by appearance. Sometimes the markings can be deceptive, and in certain cases there is no difference between the male and female markings due to mutations. If the mating persists, you might produce eggs, in which case that will be your response. You can have a DNA test to ascertain gender if you’re certain and don’t want to wait to find out if one bird lays eggs.

Thank you for asking Lafeber,

Brenda Have a question?

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can cockatiels breed with other birds

can cockatiels breed with other birds

can cockatiels breed with other birds

can cockatiels breed with other birds

can cockatiels breed with other birds

can cockatiels breed with other birds

can cockatiels breed with other birds

can cockatiels breed with other birds

can cockatiels breed with other birds

can cockatiels breed with other birds

You should only have one pair of unrelated birds in each cage when the time comes to breed again. You’re really fortunate that the girls cooperated so well this time. When there are more birds in the cage, they usually fight over nesting boxes, raid each other’s nests, break eggs, and sometimes even murder each other’s young. A woman will murder another woman if they are rivals. And for the same reason, a man will murder another man. I can’t emphasize how unique your circumstances are because, in the majority of cases, this would have resulted in a tragic conclusion. From now on, as soon as the chicks are weaned, always remove them from the parents. If you decide to keep them, you must keep them separated by gender to prevent breeding. Cockatiels in captivity will breed far too young, which is unhealthy for them. A female should wait until she is at least two years old before pairing her with a male or allowing her to breed. A male must be at least 18 months old, ideally two years. This is the same advise that breeders who produce show-quality cockatiels will give you because they support ethical breeding A profit-driven breeder will advise you to allow them to breed as much as they like. I apologize for not giving you sound breeding advice earlier; however, you now realize how crucial it is to properly care for your breeding birds.

The chick will not be regarded as healthy if the father of these chicks is also the father of the daughter here. If you do sell or give it away, you should advise against breeding it. If it has that many feathers, it should be out of the box by now. Adults may be picking on it because they think it is weak from inbreeding, or the male may want to get rid of it to start breeding again. I would move the daughter to a different cage with her almost-grown chick. If the chick is that close to taking flight, it no longer needs to be in a nest box. They typically leave the box by themselves after they have the majority of their feathers. At that point, the nest box ought to be taken down, and the parents ought to be made to take a minimum of six months off from reproducing. When the breeding season ends in the wild due to environmental changes, the adults leave the nest and move on. After being weaned and becoming independent of their parents, the chicks will join a flock. It is our duty to restrict a pair’s clutch count in captivity to no more than two per year, which is one more than a wild pair would have because we offer ideal conditions all year round. The hen will eventually perish from overbreeding if permitted to raise clutch after clutch, as this is not how they are supposed to be raised.

I have two mothers: Mom The issue is that the mother, father, or maybe the other two chicks from the mother are pecking at the one chick the daughter had. I have an extra breeding box; is it okay to place the chick inside and inform its mother that’s where it will be going forward? It’s almost ready to take flight and has all of its feathers, etc.

Unfortunately, by leaving the offspring with the parents, you have a very unnatural breeding situation here. As soon as the chicks are weaned, they must always be removed from their parents. Otherwise one of two scenarios will take place. Either the parents will harass and assault the children in an attempt to get them to leave. Because of this innate behavior, related birds cannot reproduce in the wild. The other scenario, which is limited to captivity, involves the parents eventually breeding with their offspring once they reach a certain age. Related birds should never be allowed to breed. It can result in weak and unwell chicks, deformities, and shorter lifespans. It also dilutes the gene pool. The next generation of birds becomes even weaker if the inbred bird is bred. The lifespan of cockatiels bred in captivity is decreasing, partly because of inbreeding and careless breeding.

Please take the nest box out after the other chicks have departed from it, and give the parents at least six months of rest. By reducing their daily light exposure to 8–10 hours and covering the cage early in the evening, you can turn back the ideal breeding conditions. For the time being, cease providing any fresh food or eggs. Rearrange the perches and any toys in the cage. Move the cage to another place in the room. In essence, you want to disturb their secure, stable nesting area so that they won’t lay eggs again until they have had enough time to rest.