can birds get through chicken wire

I have 6 bird feeding areas in a large garden. Different species prefer different areas and different types of feeders. I sometimes move things around based on observations.

At this time of year, when the starlings descend en masse, there is nowhere safe for the sparrows to feed. The other small birds (finches/tits/buntings etc) seem to be happy at the bottom of the garden under a big tree, but the sparrows have never used those feeders. The three feeding areas theyre happy with are all mobbed right now, probably for the next 3-4 weeks while the starling fledglings demand to be fed.

Yesterday, I built a large approx 800cm x 800cm x 1600cm cage around a bird table placed near the sparrow bush, wrapped it in PVC chicken wire with 50mm holes, and hung several feeders inside. It took the starlings about 20 minutes to work it out, then it was mobbed. The sparrows showed curiosity but were scared off. Today Ive replaced the wire with 25mm holes. Ive currently got a greater spotted woodpecker and scores of starlings trying to break in (dont worry, they have other feeders). But the holes look too small for sparrows.

I based my idea on a feeding cage I once saw that had lots of tits and sparrows feeding inside, but never got the chance to ask what wire they used. If 50mm is too big and 25mm is too small, does anyone have any ideas of what might work? I can enlarge some of the holes, and work it out through trial and error, but thought there might be experts who can advise.

If all else fails, I know the starlings will all be gone soon, and the sparrows are perfectly capable of finding insects and other food at this time of year. But this might come in handy at other times of the year or under other circumstances.

There is nowhere safe for the sparrows to eat at this time of year when the starlings descend in large numbers. The sparrows have never used those feeders, but the other small birds—finches, tits, buntings, and so on—seem content at the base of the garden beneath a large tree. As the starling fledglings demand to be fed, the three feeding areas they are content with are currently crowded and likely will be for the next three to four weeks.

My concept was inspired by a feeding cage I once saw that was filled with numerous tits and sparrows, but I was unable to find out what kind of wire was used. I know I can enlarge some of the holes and figure it out by trial and error, but I thought there might be experts who could offer some advice if 50mm is too big and 25mm is too small.

After building a sizable enclosure yesterday (it measures about 800 cm by 800 cm by 1600 cm), I covered the bird table next to the sparrow bush with PVC chicken wire that has holes per 50 mm, and I hung multiple feeders inside. The starlings needed roughly twenty minutes to figure it out before they were swarmed. The sparrows showed curiosity but were scared off. Today Ive replaced the wire with 25mm holes. Right now, a large number of starlings are attempting to break in, but don’t worry, they have other feeders. I have a greater spotted woodpecker. But the holes look too small for sparrows.

I have 6 bird feeding areas in a large garden. Different species prefer different areas and different types of feeders. I sometimes move things around based on observations.

If all else fails, I’m sure the starlings will disappear soon, and at this time of year, sparrows can easily find insects and other food sources. However, this could be useful at different times of the year or in different situations.

I need to make cages to protect my blueberries. Since I am aware that birds can fit through small spaces, is anyone using chicken wire for this?

FAQ

Does chicken wire keep birds out?

Chicken wire makes an effective barrier against birds. It is sturdy and holds its shape over delicate plants and shrubs. It also lasts several years, so it’s a good investment. Accommodate plant growth by putting the chicken wire on posts or hoops.

What animal can get through chicken wire?

Surprisingly, chicken wire was designed to keep chickens in but not predators out. Some predators, like fisher cats, raccoons and snakes, can easily access your chickens through the larger links in the wiring. Instead of chicken wire opt for 1/2 inch hardware cloth instead.

Can parakeets fit through chicken wire?

To the best of my knowledge, all chicken wire is unsafe for parrots due to the zinc content of galvanized wire. The opening size in chicken wire is not appropriate for a green cheek conure either, and the poor bird could easily get parts of his/her body stuck in and injured in the wire.

What can break through chicken wire?

Dogs, coyotes, foxes, and raccoons will break through chicken wire very quickly to get to their desired prey. Chicken wire also features holes that are usually 1” big and weasels can easily fit through those holes.