can birds eat granola bars

Since granola bars are difficult to find in the land of the rising sun, I decided to make them! I was really happy with how these turned out. I used the recipe on the Quaker Oatmeal website, but I added salted almonds because who doesn’t love sweet & salty together. You could also add chocolate chips, any chopped dried fruit, or coconut, or substitute maple syrup for the honey for a different flavor.

4 1/2 cups Old Fashioned Oats (or 4 cups Quick Cooking Oats) 1 1/2 cups chopped nuts (such as walnuts and/or salted almonds) 1 cup brown sugar, firmly packed 3/4 cup butter (170 g), melted 1/2 cup honey 1 tsp. vanilla 1/4 tsp. salt

*A note on baking time: Japanese ovens don’t like to make things crispy. My granola bars were chewy, but a regular oven may produce crunchy ones. Both are good results!

You’re probably wondering what these granola bars have to do with birds. Well, yesterday we ventured out into the rain to visit Kobe Kacho-en, a bird & flower garden in Kobe. We walked around in a giant green house, ooh-ing and ahh-ing over giant lily pads that were just begging to be walked on, flowers that looked like they belonged in the Amazon, and baskets hanging above our heads cascading with colorful blossoms. Then we transitioned to the bird rooms: a duck, swan, chicken, and crane room; a penguin room; a tucan room– slightly scary because the birds swoop down over your head and you can feel the air from their wings–and lastly an owl room, featuring species from around the world, both big and small. In each room you could purchase a small paper cup of bird seed to feed them. They also sold bags of shelled walnuts and almonds in the gift shop (an anomaly in Japanese grocery stores), meant for your pet bird, but we got excited about them too!

Four and a half cups Old Fashioned Oats (or four cups Quick Cooking Oats) one and a half cups chopped nuts (walnuts and/or salted almonds) one cup firmly packed brown sugar one and a half cups honey one tsp vanilla 1/4 tsp. salt.

You’re probably wondering what these granola bars have to do with birds. Well, yesterday we ventured out into the rain to visit Kobe Kacho-en, a bird & flower garden in Kobe. We walked around in a giant green house, ooh-ing and ahh-ing over giant lily pads that were just begging to be walked on, flowers that looked like they belonged in the Amazon, and baskets hanging above our heads cascading with colorful blossoms. Then we transitioned to the bird rooms: a duck, swan, chicken, and crane room; a penguin room; a tucan room– slightly scary because the birds swoop down over your head and you can feel the air from their wings–and lastly an owl room, featuring species from around the world, both big and small. In each room you could purchase a small paper cup of bird seed to feed them. They also sold bags of shelled walnuts and almonds in the gift shop (an anomaly in Japanese grocery stores), meant for your pet bird, but we got excited about them too!

*A word of caution regarding baking times: Japanese ovens dislike crisping food. My granola bars came out chewy, but you could get crunchy ones with a regular oven. Both are good results!.

Since granola bars are difficult to find in the land of the rising sun, I decided to make them! I was really happy with how these turned out. I used the recipe on the Quaker Oatmeal website, but I added salted almonds because who doesn’t love sweet & salty together. You could also add chocolate chips, any chopped dried fruit, or coconut, or substitute maple syrup for the honey for a different flavor.

Bird foods consisting primarily of large seeds, nuts, vegetables, fruits, pellets, etc., are available for purchase.

You have chosen to replace carefully blended mixes developed over many years of research and experience by large bird food manufacturers with sugar-sweetened cereal.

Lower-cost pre-made mixes will contain more peanuts, corn, sunflower seeds, and other inexpensive ingredients.

Higgins Sunburst Macaw 25 lb. is a more expensive blend, but it contains better ingredients and more safflower seeds than sunflower seeds.

This mixture is even better with 20 pounds of Volkman Macaw Safflower Seeds instead of any sunflower seeds.

FAQ

Are Cheerios OK for birds?

Naturally low sugar cereals, sure. Plain Cheerios are fine in small amounts, but they also have sugar so don’t make it a regular offering.

What foods should birds not eat?

Birds should not be offered many of the foods humans eat. Bread (fresh or stale) provides no real nutritional value for birds; moldy bread can harm birds. Chocolate is toxic to birds, just as it is to dogs and cats (it contains theobromine). Table scraps should be avoided and they also attract mice or rats.

Can birds eat honey?

While parrots may be attracted to the sweetness of honey, it is not recommended to feed them honey as it can be harmful to their health. Honey can contain harmful bacteria, which can cause digestive problems and even lead to illness or death in some cases.

Can birds eat chocolate?

However, even in very small amounts, chocolate can be toxic to birds. Chocolate contains both theobromine and caffeine which can cause vomiting and diarrhea, increase heart rate, result in hyperactivity, induce tremors and seizures, and even cause death in birds.