are incense bad for birds

>I know that scented candles are bad for parrots, but would it hurt them >to be in the same house (not room) where natural-product incense is >burning? it consists of crushed herbs and a little wood fiber….. > >tia, >angela > Combustion products and birds are a bad combination, period. Makes no difference whether they are from candles, kerosine heaters, unvented gas heaters, or incense….

>I know that scented candles are bad for parrots, but would it hurt them >to be in the same house (not room) where natural-product incense is >burning? it consists of crushed herbs and a little wood fiber….. > >tia, >angela

> I know that scented candles are bad for parrots, but would it hurt them > to be in the same house (not room) where natural-product incense is > burning? it consists of crushed herbs and a little wood fiber….. > > tia, > angela >

— Kellie Final Portrait * A Novel by Kellie Sisson Snider Kass Arts Publicity <http://kassarts.bizland.com>

> Im going to catch hell for this, but I use incense in my house and I have > birds.

You wont catch hell, Kellie. I think it depends on the type of incense. I burn smudge sticks which I make myself from sage I find in the mountains. My clients love this but I never burn it in the same room as the birds. It is free of chemicals so I dont worry. Incense is another matter. There are some that make me cough. I burn that which is not strong and I get at Wild Oats. My favorite is patchouli (sorry, I cut my wisdom teeth on patchouli and musk oils) I know people who smoke around their birds and their birds are fine but I would not allow smoking in the house, regardless. There was a man I was vaguely acquainted with who used to blow pot smoke into his AGs face and he thought it was a riot that the bird got high. I dont know that birds get high, but that is another story for another time.

While the birds may not drop dead right away, you know without any doubt that smoking has a cumulative detrimental effect on humans. You should see the anti-smoking commercials we get here in Canada, showing autopsies of smokers, squeezing guck out of arteries like brown toothpaste, showing lungs, and brains with blobs of congealed blood in them that fall out when you cut the brain with a knife. You also know that birds are a lot smaller and more sensitive to airborne pollutants than humans are.

> My clients love this but I never burn it in the same room as the birds. It > is free of chemicals so I dont worry.

Indeed. Obviously one wouldnt want to expose the birds directly to the smoke, but the indirect scent is not a problem.

> Incense is another matter. There are some that make me cough. I burn that > which is not > strong and I get at Wild Oats. My favorite is patchouli (sorry, I cut my

> birds and their birds are fine but I would not allow smoking in the house, > regardless.

I agree. I do burn incense in the house, but I burn natural kinds, not the kinds that have lots of artificial scents.

> There was a man I was vaguely acquainted with who used to blow pot smoke into > his AGs face and he thought it was a riot that the bird got high. I dont > know that birds get high, but that is another story for another time.

I, too, had friends who were that idiotic and did it with their cats and dogs. I think thats unfair to them. They dont understand whats happening to them. Even if the human in question enjoys it, no telling how it affects the other species. It always made me mondo paranoid, and Id hate to add to a birds paranoia. (I havent participated in said activity in enough years that some of you were probably not born yet at the time.)

> Andee wrote: > > > I know people who smoke around their birds and their birds > > are fine >

> While the birds may not drop dead right away, you know without any > doubt that smoking has a cumulative detrimental effect on humans. You > should see the anti-smoking commercials we get here in Canada, showing > autopsies of smokers, squeezing guck out of arteries like brown > toothpaste, showing lungs, and brains with blobs of congealed blood in > them that fall out when you cut the brain with a knife. You also know > that birds are a lot smaller and more sensitive to airborne pollutants > than humans are. > > Now you decide whether or not it is okay to smoke around birds. > > Kevin > > — > Kevin Chu > ke…@portal.ca > http://super_kevin.tripod.com/ > 6BBC816E B3A1D61C 76E0D5D3 7528D503 0B08 D678

> > I, too, had friends who were that idiotic and did it with their cats and dogs. > I think thats unfair to them. They dont understand whats happening to them. > Even if the human in question enjoys it, no telling how it affects the other > species. It always made me mondo paranoid, and Id hate to add to a birds > paranoia. (I havent participated in said activity in enough years that some of > you were probably not born yet at the time.)

I have seen that, too. Especially cats. I think the cats rather enjoyed it, but I would prefer to give them catnip. Once, in the 80s, I was on holiday, and four of my five kids were still at home. Years later I heard the story of how they made funny brownies and Amy the Collie ate half the batch, quite by “accident” of course. Amy seemed OK then but died within two years. I often wonder……..

> I have seen that, too. Especially cats. I think the cats rather enjoyed > it, but I would prefer to give them catnip. Once, in the 80s, I was on > holiday, and four of my five kids were still at home. Years later I heard > the story of how they made funny brownies and Amy the Collie ate half the > batch, quite by “accident” of course. Amy seemed OK then but died within > two years. I often wonder……..

> I was never blessed with seeing arteries or brains in the > conditions that Kevin mentioned!

I forgot to mention that 1) the commercials and ads we get in Canada are not like the ones from the states, because we have truth-in-advertising laws up here, and 2) at the end of the commercials, theres narration about “this is a brain/artery/bit out of a xxx-year-old smoker” and the smoker was always in the 20s or 30s when he/she died.

Mmmmm, toothpaste! And about the brain, after seeing that blob of gunk fall out of that brain it makes you think twice about ever going to another place where they allow smoking, even if you dont smoke yourself.

We have them here, too. Unfortunately we also have lots of law suits when companies whine that they cant do whatever they want. Which means the laws dont mean anything.

> and 2) at the end of the commercials, theres narration about “this is > a brain/artery/bit out > of a xxx-year-old smoker” and the smoker was always in the 20s or 30s > when he/she died.

Really? We only get a statement that: Smoking may be hazardous to your health and cause birth defects, and other similar “warnings”.

> Mmmmm, toothpaste! And about the brain, after seeing that blob of > gunk fall out of that brain it makes you think twice about ever going > to another place where they allow smoking, even if you dont smoke > yourself.

I dont remember for sure, but I think theres a difference in concept or something that makes the laws have different effects. Onus on one party or the other, etc..

Dont know. But I do know that I am ALL FOR the new laws that ban smoking in public places! More and more places are smoke free now, and some pub owners think that their customers want to be able to smoke so they dont like it, but …. Lotsa politics, not about birds.

> Dont know. But I do know that I am ALL FOR the new laws that ban > smoking in public places! More and more places are smoke free now, > and some pub owners think that their customers want to be able to > smoke so they dont like it, but …. Lotsa politics, not about > birds.

Windows, Doors, Fans, Etc.

Pet birds can fly just as well as their wild counterparts, but they frequently encounter risks in homes that wild birds would never experience. Pet birds that are in flight frequently fly out of open windows and doors and strike ceiling fans and mirrors. They also fly into open washers, dryers and refrigerators. They risk being crushed if they fall on top of an open door and it is slammed.

Pet birds have the potential to fly into open flames (in fireplaces and lit candles) as well as into open containers of hot food and liquid (like coffee, tea, soup, and boiling water). They can fly down to the floor and get inadvertently stepped on, or they can fly into open toilets where they could drown. Additionally, birds fly into Venetian blinds and become entangled in cords or stuck between slats.

Your bird needs to be watched when outside of the cage if you plan to let it fly. If not, your veterinarian can temporarily clip your bird’s wings to prevent it from taking off. The wings will regrow in a few months if you decide flying is the best option for your bird. This will allow your bird to land safely on the ground without getting lifted. : Rosa Jay / Shutterstock.

Like young children, parrots are highly oral and enjoy putting everything in their mouths. As their name, “hook bills,” suggests, parrots manipulate, explore, and chew objects with the help of their strong jaws, tongues, and pointy beaks. However, parrots’ natural curiosity can get them into trouble in our homes.

Pet birds gnaw on soldered or stained glass objects, galvanized wire, linoleum, batteries, and other items found in homes or garages that contain toxic metals like lead, zinc, and copper. They also chew paint on baseboards and window sills that may contain lead. Additionally, they pick up tiny, shiny objects that entice them to eat, like jewelry. Therefore, during their time spent outside of their cages, parrots need to be properly watched and kept away from any potentially alluring toxins. : preecha2531 / Shutterstock.

Due to their special respiratory systems, birds have heightened sensitivity to toxins in the form of aerosols. When non-stick coatings like Teflon, which are used on pots and pans as well as inside some stoves and toaster ovens, are heated to high temperatures, they have the potential to kill pet birds. These coatings, when heated, release an odorless, colorless vapor that causes birds to inhale and accumulate fluid in their lungs, which results in nearly instantaneous death.

Furthermore, some candles contain lead in their wicks, which can aerosolize when they burn. As a result, these candles should never be lit near birds. Other airborne pollutants that shouldn’t be used near birds include perfumes, cooking fumes, incense, and spray cleaners since they can irritate their respiratory tract lining. : I WALL / Shutterstock.

Birds are extremely sensitive to cigarette and cigar smoke, just like they are to aerosols. Birds that inhale smoke may suffer from chronic respiratory tract infections, breathing problems, or even pass away. Birds can become ill from smoking-related illnesses as well as from consuming nicotine from smokers’ hands or clothes. When birds perch on a hand coated in nicotine, their feet, beaks, and mouths may become irritated. When nicotine irritates their feet, birds will sometimes chew on their toes until they bleed. When birds preen feathers that have been exposed to secondhand smoke, they may also consume nicotine.

When smokers smoke far from their birds, their clothes still contain nicotine and other chemicals that the birds can inhale and consume when they perch on them. Therefore, a bird is not the ideal pet for you if you smoke, even if it’s outside of your home. : motorolka / Shutterstock.

Since cats and dogs are natural predators, many bird owners also own these animals, and they frequently have an innate desire to chase after prey like birds.

Playful dogs and cats, even the most well-meaning ones, can pierce a bird’s thin skin with their sharp nails and crush its small body with their powerful jaws and teeth. Dogs and cats can cause scratches and bite wounds that expose birds to foreign bacteria, which can result in serious and occasionally fatal infections.

Similar to playful dogs and cats, well-meaning young children who just want to play with a bird run the risk of dropping it or holding it too tightly, which can cause serious harm or even death. It is therefore imperative that dogs, cats, and small children never engage in unsupervised bird interaction, regardless of how gentle these seemingly amiable playmates appear. : Africa Studio / Shutterstock.

Chocolate, coffee, and alcohol-containing foods are poisonous to birds and should never be given to them, not even in tiny amounts. Furthermore, salty foods like pretzels, chips, popcorn, and some crackers, as well as avocados, garlic, and onions, can seriously injure birds.

Garlic and onions can cause birds to develop potentially fatal anemia, while avocados can cause their lungs to fill with fluid. A bird’s electrolyte and fluid balance may be upset by consuming a lot of salt, which could lead to cardiac issues. Birds enjoy food just like humans do, but bird owners should exercise caution when giving their pets potentially harmful foods. : Donna Ellen Coleman / Shutterstock.

Birds like to chew on everything around them, including plants. In the wild, birds naturally gnaw on plants to survive. Many people who own pets have plants in their homes, but they never consider whether or not birds can safely consume them. Some bird watchers may allow their birds to perch on porches or plants in their yards without ever giving it any thought.

When consumed, some plants only irritate a bird’s digestive system, but others have the potential to be fatal. Common houseplants that pose a risk to birds include yew, calla lilies, mistletoe, philodendron, and rhododendron. To ensure that a plant is safe for their pet bird, bird owners should consult their veterinarians or call a pet poison control hotline before exposing their bird to it. : Pavel Kubarkov / Shutterstock.

According to the ASPCA, ingesting human prescription and over-the-counter medications frequently results in pet deaths of all kinds every year. Particularly birds are drawn to glossy, colorful objects like pills and enjoy putting them in their mouths, frequently inadvertently consuming them.

Birds quickly metabolize pills after they’ve been consumed, so if they unintentionally swallow large amounts of human medication meant for humans, it could cause fatalities or severe illness. Owners of birds need to be careful not to give their birds access to medications by leaving them out. : Ruslan Grumble / Shutterstock.

Common tools used to catch rodents and insects, like glue traps, snap traps, and sticky paper, can seriously harm or even kill birds if they get into them. Birds that are in flight may land on traps and become stuck in them, or they may consume poison bait from traps and perish.

Even with mild solvents like Dawn dishwashing detergent, which are frequently used for this purpose, trying to free birds from glue traps can cause their fragile skin to tear and their feathers to painfully come out. Never use glue or baited pest traps near birds, and make sure to get emergency veterinary care for any birds that become stuck in them. : Alena Ozerova / Shutterstock.

While humans have bacteria, yeast, and other organisms in their mouths that are not found in birds and can cause serious, potentially fatal infections, pet owners shouldn’t do this for their birds. Instead, birds should feed each other by swallowing food and then regurgitating it back up to share. Therefore, if food on a plate has come into contact with utensils that have been in a human mouth, bird owners should never feed their birds from their mouths or even from their plates.

Bird owners should bird-proof their homes, especially if their birds fly, just as new parents and dog owners need to baby-proof and puppy-proof their spaces. An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure, as the saying goes, and this is definitely true when it comes to keeping your pet bird safe and content in your home.

10 Home Dangers for Pet Birds

By Dr. Laurie Hess, Dipl ABVP (Avian Practice)

We make every effort to ensure the safety of our family members at home, including our pets. However, because of their innate need to chew and their ability to fly, pet birds are vulnerable to a number of potential home hazards that do not affect other pets and that you may not even be aware of. What kinds of dangers are there? Take a look at these ten typical home threats to pet birds: DemarK / Shutterstock

I have acquaintances who were that foolish as well, and they did it with their dogs and cats. I think thats unfair to them. They dont understand whats happening to them. Even if the involved human finds it enjoyable, it’s impossible to know how it will impact other animals. It always made me extremely paranoid, and I wouldn’t want to increase a bird’s anxiety. (Since I haven’t engaged in said activity in long enough, some of you were probably not even born when it happened. ).

>I know that scented candles are bad for parrots, but would it hurt them >to be in the same house (not room) where natural-product incense is >burning? it consists of crushed herbs and a little wood fiber. > >tia, >angela > Combustion products and birds are a bad combination, period. It doesn’t matter if they come from incense, kerosine heaters, unvented gas heaters, or candles.

We have them here, too. Regretfully, when businesses complain that they are unable to do as they please, we also see a lot of lawsuits. Which means the laws dont mean anything.

> > I, too, had friends who were that idiotic and did it with their cats and dogs. > I think thats unfair to them. They dont understand whats happening to them. > Even if the human in question enjoys it, no telling how it affects the other > species. It always gave me the creeps, and I wouldn’t want to add to a bird’s anxiety. (I haven’t engaged in the aforementioned activity for long enough that some of ).

> Im going to catch hell for this, but I use incense in my house and I have > birds.

FAQ

Is it OK to burn incense around birds?

Considerations for Different Pets Smaller pets, like birds, may need extra caution when it comes to burning incense. Birds have delicate respiratory systems, and even small amounts of smoke can lead to lung issues or respiratory diseases. We recommend to avoid burning incense in the same room as caged pets.

Are incense toxic to animals?

Generally, yes. Incense isn’t good for dogs, and it’s recommended that you don’t burn it in front of them. According to Emergency Vet USA, the sticks can contain scents that dogs’ noses are sensitive to. The smoke can irritate their lungs, and this is especially true with pups and other animals with respiratory issues.

Does incense repel birds?

Birds are super sensitive to many compounds that would not bother humans and it could be fatal for a bird if you use scent diffusers or incense, and smoking around birds is a very bad idea as well.

What smells are bad for birds?

Sources: Gasses like carbon monoxide, smoke from tobacco products, and fumes from new carpets and furniture, air fresheners, scented candles, paints, glues, household cleaning products, mothballs, hair spray, and nail polish can all be harmful when they are in close proximity to birds.