are dodo birds alive today

How do you bring back an extinct species?

A drawing depicting a pair of dodo birds in a forest In the Indian Ocean, to the east of Madagascar, on the island of Mauritius, lived the extinct flightless dodo (Raphus cucullatus). (Credit: Adobe Stock).

Similar to the movie Jurassic Park, DNA is needed to revive an extinct animal. While DNA from dinosaurs and other extinct species is too deteriorated to be restored, DNA from species like the woolly mammoth and dodo bird can be recovered.

Galante claims that a related species that exists today was created through incubation of this DNA. When it comes to the dodo bird, pigeons are utilized.

Dodo birds will hatch from the eggs laid by pigeons. Though not precisely the same species, the new dodos will be similar enough to fill the voids left by their extinction.

Colossal plans to establish wildlife refuges for the de-extinct species. The mammoth will be housed in an arctic refuge, while the dodo will be raised on Mauritius. Humans will not be allowed to visit.

“We’re not creating a de-extinction petting zoo,” Galante said. The refuges will be carefully managed.

Should we bring back extinct animals?

Galante stated that bringing extinct animals back isn’t just because we can “It restores something to the top of the food chain in the case of the dodo.” ”.

are dodo birds alive today

The dodo bird was a giant, flightless pigeon. On the island of Mauritius, “it had no natural predators,” according to Galante Sailors visited the island off the east coast of Africa in the early 1600s.

There was nothing else to do on the island, so when sailors arrived, they would walk around and bump them on the head out of pure boredom. ”.

By 1692, the species was extinct.

The removal of the bird left a gap in the environment’s ecosystem. Restoring it, in theory, should help fill that gap.

“A creature that has been eliminated by humans is being brought back, both an individual and a group of them that will most importantly, repair a damaged ecosystem.” ”.

CNN values your feedback 1. How relevant is this ad to you? 2. Did you encounter any technical issues? Video player was slow to load content Video content never loaded Ad froze or did not finish loading Video content did not start after ad Audio on ad was too loud Other issues Ad never loaded Ad prevented/slowed the page from loading Content moved around while ad loaded Ad was repetitive to ads I’ve seen previously Other issues Thank You! Your effort and contribution in providing this feedback is much appreciated. Close Ad Feedback

are dodo birds alive today

are dodo birds alive today

are dodo birds alive today

are dodo birds alive today

are dodo birds alive today

are dodo birds alive today

are dodo birds alive today

are dodo birds alive today

are dodo birds alive today

are dodo birds alive today

are dodo birds alive today

are dodo birds alive today

are dodo birds alive today

are dodo birds alive today

are dodo birds alive today

are dodo birds alive today

are dodo birds alive today

A bold partnership between conservationists and geneticists aims to revive the extinct dodo and return it to its former home in Mauritius.

Colossal Biosciences, a US-based biotechnology and genetic engineering company, has partnered with the Mauritian Wildlife Foundation to find a suitable home for large flightless birds. Colossal Biosciences is pursuing the “de-extinction” of multiple species, including the woolly mammoth.

The dodo has been extinct since 1681; a combination of predation by humans and animals introduced by humans led to its downfall, turning it into a textbook case for extinction. But according to the partners, its return to Mauritius could benefit the dodo’s immediate environment and other species.

In January 2023, Colossal first declared its plan to bring the dodo back to life. Although it is unclear exactly when it will be able to do so, new information about its plans to recreate the species has surfaced.

Beth Shapiro, chief paleogeneticist at Colossal, has sequenced the entire genome of the dodo. Furthermore, the company reports that it has successfully sequenced the genomes of two extinct dodo relatives: the Nicobar pigeon, which lives on islands in Southeast Asia that span the Indian and Pacific Oceans, and the solitaire, an extinct relative from Rodrigues Island, near Mauritius.

are dodo birds alive today

Geneticists at Colossal have found cells that act as a precursor for ovaries or testes in the Nicobar pigeon can grow successfully in a chicken embryo. They are now researching to see if these cells (called primordial germ cells, or PGCs) can turn into sperm and eggs.

This is a vital step in creating hybridized animals through reproduction. Scientists have previously introduced PGCs to create a chicken fathered by a duck – for which a duck embryo was injected with chicken PGCs, producing an adult duck with the sperm of a rooster. It then bred with a hen, which gave birth to a chick.

Colossal plans to go down a similar route. To find out how the genomes of the dodo and solitaire differ from those of the Nicobar pigeon, it will first compare them. Next, it will modify a Nicobar’s PGCs to express a dodo’s physical characteristics.

After that, the modified PGCs will be added to the embryos of a sterile rooster and chicken. The chicken and rooster will be able to reproduce with the introduction of the edited PGCs, and because of the hybridized pigeon DNA in their reproductive systems, their progeny should resemble dodos.

The chief animal officer of Colossal, Matt James, stated in an email that “the restored dodo will be indiscernible from what we know of the dodo’s appearance physically.”

Because “most of the technologies that we use for cloning in mammals does not exist in birds today,” James called the project “an amazing engine of innovation for avian genetics, genomics, and cell biology.” He did not, however, provide a timeframe for the creation of the first embryo.

FAQ

Are there any dodo birds still alive?

The dodo, a large flightless bird endemic to the small Indian Ocean island of Mauritius, has been extinct since the 17thcentury.

Would the dodo bird survive today?

It’s not possible to bring back the dodo, even if it becomes possible to build a bird with a dodo genome. Beyond behavior, the dodo proxy must survive in a world that is significantly different from that of more than 300 years ago, when the dodo went extinct.

Do any dodo remains exist?

Only three dodo specimens from this period exist, despite records of living dodos being brought from Mauritius. One of the three, the so-called ‘Oxford Dodo’, is a specimen that was part of the Tradescant collection, one of the founding collections of the Ashmolean Museum at the University of Oxford.

What killed the dodo bird?

The Dodo is a lesson in extinction. Found by Dutch soldiers around 1600 on an island in the Indian Ocean, the Dodo became extinct less than 80 years later because of deforestation, hunting, and destruction of their nests by animals brought to the island by the Dutch.